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Fire & Ice Burger with Idaho Purple Fries Recipe

Fire & Ice Burger with Idaho Purple Fries Recipe


Two posh ingredients, Florida Spiny lobster meat and organic grass-fed beef rib eye, combine to produce a unique burger expereince.

Complimented by spicy pickled bird's eye chili and very ripe sweet plantains fried in duck fat.

Find the complete recipe on http://www.lazarocooks.com/

Ingredients

For the burger:

10 oz organic grass-fed beef rib eye

1 tsp chili powder

1 tsp cayenne pepper

1 tsp smoked paprika

1 tsp ground mustard seeds

coarse sea salt

ground black pepper

2 tbs safflower oil

2 tbs unsalted butter

For the lobster salad:

1 lb Florida Spiny lobster tail meat - cooked

2 tbs sweet pickle relish

1/2 red bell pepper - seeded & diced

1 shallot - peeled & minced

1/2 cup olive oil mayo

1 tbs Meyer Lemon juice

1 tbs jalapeno sauce

1 tsp chopped chervil

1 tsp chopped chives

Directions

For the burger:

Grind the rib eye steak using the smaller grinder plate.

Form patties. Do not season. Cover and fridge overnight.

Remove patties from fridge 45 minutes before cooking.

In a mixing bowl, combine the chili powder, ground mustard, cayenne, smoked paprika, sea salt and black pepper.

Season both sides of the patties with the spice mix.

Heat the safflower oil over medium-high heat in a cast iron skillet. Add the butter. Once the butter melts and foams, add the patties.

Cook, flipping every 20 seconds to ensure even browning, until desired doneness.

For the lobster salad:

In a glass bowl, combine the cooked lobster meat, sweet relish, shallot, bell pepper, mayo, lemon juice and jalapeno sauce.

Season with sea salt and black pepper. Check the seasoning.

Fold in the chopped herbs.

Cover with plastic wrap. Fridge for 2 hours.

Serve cold.


Fire and Ice Summer Salad

A great use for that summer harvest of garden fresh tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and jalapenos, this is another southern favorite and certainly a personal favorite of my own. I can make a meal out of this salad alone on a hot summer day.

Be sure to check out my other cucumber salads, including the Spicy, Sweet and Sour Cucumber Salad, Creamed Cucumbers and Onions and Simple Summer Salad. I think all of these will soon be your favorites too and I hope that you enjoy them as an occasional change from the usual tossed garden salad.

Here's how to make it and as always, the full recipe with full ingredient list, instructions and a printable are a little further down the page. Just scroll or swipe past the pictures!

For the dressing, combine two vinegars, sugar, salt, horseradish, and both celery and mustard seed in a small saucepan. Stir and bring to a boil, boiling for 1 minute. Set aside.

In a large glass bowl, combine bell pepper, red onion, jalapeno and tomatoes. Pour the hot vinegar and sugar mixture over the vegetables and set aside to cool. Add the thinly sliced cucumbers, stir, seal or cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for several hours. Use a slotted spoon for serving to drain excess liquid off when serving.

Check out more of my cucumber salad recipes on Pinterest!

If you make this or any of my recipes, I'd love to see your results! Just snap a photo and hashtag it #DeepSouthDish on social media or tag me @deepsouthdish on Instagram!

Recipe: Fire 'n Ice Summer Salad

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish

Prep time: 10 min | Inactive time: 2 hours | Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup of red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon horseradish
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seed
  • 1 medium green bell pepper , cut into thin strips
  • 1 small red onion , cut in half and sliced thin
  • 1 jalapeno , chopped fine
  • 3 large tomatoes , cut into chunks
  • 2 medium cucumbers , peeled and sliced thin

Combine both of the vinegars with the sugar, salt, horseradish, and celery and mustard seeds in a small saucepan. Stir and bring to a boil, boiling for 1 minute. Set aside.

In a large glass bowl, combine bell pepper, red onion, jalapeno and tomatoes. Pour the hot vinegar and sugar mixture over the vegetables and set aside to cool.

Add the cucumbers, stir, cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for several hours. Use a slotted spoon for serving to drain excess liquid off when serving.

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.

As an Amazon Associate, Deep South Dish earns from qualifying purchases. See full disclosure for details.


Hey Y’all! Welcome to some good ole, down home southern cooking. Pull up a chair, grab some iced tea, and 'sit a bit' as we say down south. If this is your first time visiting Deep South Dish, you can sign up for FREE updates via EMAIL or RSS feed, or you can catch up with us on Facebook and Twitter too!

© Copyright 2008-2021 – Mary Foreman – Deep South Dish LLC - All Rights Reserved

Material Disclosure: This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Unless otherwise noted, you should assume that post links to the providers of goods and services mentioned, establish an affiliate relationship and/or other material connection and that I may be compensated when you purchase from the provider. You are never under any obligation to purchase anything when using my recipes and you should always perform due diligence before buying goods or services from anyone via the Internet or offline.

DISCLAIMER: This is a recipe site intended for entertainment. By using this site and these recipes you agree that you do so at your own risk, that you are completely responsible for any liability associated with the use of any recipes obtained from this site, and that you fully and completely release Mary Foreman and Deep South Dish LLC and all parties associated with either entity, from any liability whatsoever from your use of this site and these recipes.

ALL CONTENT PROTECTED UNDER THE DIGITAL MILLENNIUM COPYRIGHT ACT. CONTENT THEFT, EITHER PRINT OR ELECTRONIC, IS A FEDERAL OFFENSE. Recipes may be printed ONLY for personal use and may not be transmitted, distributed, reposted, or published elsewhere, in print or by any electronic means. Seek explicit permission before using any content on this site, including partial excerpts, all of which require attribution linking back to specific posts on this site. I have, and will continue to act, on all violations.


Before you begin preparing the potatoes, fill a large bowl with cold water and add a tablespoon of lemon juice. As soon as you cut the fries, you're going to transfer them to this bowl. Cut potatoes will start to discolor if they're exposed to oxygen for too long—even if they're in the water. (There's oxygen in water, after all.) But a little bit of acid in the water helps keep the potatoes nice and white.

  1. Peel the potatoes and remove any eyes.
  2. Square off the potato with your knife and slice it into 1/4-inch slabs. Cut each slab into 1/4-inch strips. The fries should be about 3 inches long. Transfer them to the cold water as you go.
  3. When the fries are cut, rinse them under cold water in the bowl until the water turns clear. The idea is to rinse off any excess starch.
  4. Add another tablespoon of lemon juice, and then a few cups of ice—enough to chill the water thoroughly. Transfer to the refrigerator to chill for about 30 minutes. This step prevents the outside of the french fries from getting too brown before the inside cooks all the way through.

12 Taro Recipes That Will Have You Craving All Things Purple

Looking to broaden your starch horizons? Meet taro root, the potato's hairy, kind of unfortunate-looking cousin.

Okay, this lil guy is kind of cute.

The taro plant is a tropical plant with large green leaves. Its root is starchy and high in fiber and is most often compared to a sweet potato or yam with pleasantly purple insides. While the plant originated in Asia (it is believed to be one of the earliest cultivated plants), it is particularly popular in many Pacific Islands, where it became a dietary staple.

Anyone who's ever been to a Hawaiian luau, for instance, might remember the unfortunate-looking poi, which is taro root pounded into a paste. While its similarity to purple/gray wallpaper paste scares many away, poi is high in iron and calcium and is thought to be a great probiotic and baby food.

Taro powder is a more popular, if a bit more processed, way of incorporating taro (and vibrant purple coloring) into baked goods and sweets like bubble tea and ice cream. But while the purple powder is fun for aesthetics, it doesn't take advantage of most of the root vegetable's versatility.


Fire 'n Ice Pickles

Fire and Ice Pickles are not a true pickling recipe, so no scoffing at me okay y'all? It's just a yummy way to dress up a jar of plain ole, cheapo, boring sour dills into a pickle that has fire and ice flavor, with a combination we southerners seem to be endeared to - sweet and spicy. We have a tendency to turn a sour thing into somethin' sweet down here, don't y'all know? Yes, that can also mean personalities. It's kinda hard to frown when you get around these thick accents we have.

Seriously, Fire 'n Ice pickles kinda sorta remind me of those Alabama Wickles pickles that I have gotten addicted fallen in love with here lately, only much more accessible if you don't happen to live in the state of Alabama, and certainly much cheaper less expensive. And, get this . the Fire 'n Ice Pickles aren't difficult at all to do - it just takes a couple of days to transform them from sour to sassy. These are perfect for simple snackin' or to put on your favorite burger, sandwich or in salads. At least now I have something to fill in with in between my Wickles Pickles fixes.

Start off with a large jar of plain, whole dill pickles, the big one that is around 46 ounces, and then slice the pickles about 1/4 to 1/2 inch or so, depending on how you like them. You can use the pre-sliced pickles too of course, but go for the thicker sliced ones instead of the thin chips. Do not, however, get the kosher dills. While some brands may work, generally speaking kosher dills don't react well to this process and will often turn into a shriveled mess. I once tried the large jar of Great Value dill pickles and they reacted the same way even though they were not marked kosher, so just a caution there. I actually like to do two large jars when I do these. I used Vlasic brand here.

You can mix everything together right away, but I prefer to layer all of the ingredients for the first soak. That way, as the sugar begins to draw out the juices from the pickles, all of the seasonings slowly infuse into the pickles, instead of everything sinking to the bottom. Use a large glass bowl, container or jar - I use an old sun tea gallon jar for mine. Divide the sliced pickles into 4 equal parts. The first layer will be 1/4 of the sliced pickles (not 1/4 cup, 1/4 of the total pickles you have). Top that with 1/2 cup of sugar, 1 garlic clove that is either chopped or very thinly sliced, 1/4 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon of chopped pickled jalapeno and, if you like, add 1/2 teaspoon of a pickling spice blend.

Repeat all of the layers, top off with the remaining sugar, then seal the jar and leave it on the counter for an hour or until the sugars have broken down and liquified. Stir well, cover and leave out several hours or overnight. Give the pickles another good stir, stick them in the refrigerator, and except for a stir every once in awhile, ignore them for a couple of days.

After that you'll have a super delicious, crunchy, spicy, garlicky, sweet dill pickle. Crazy huh?

You can of course use more or less garlic, jalapenos, and red pepper flakes, according to your own taste.

Recipe: Fire 'n Ice Pickles

  • 1 large ( 46 ounce ) jar whole sour dill pickles , about 6 cups sliced (not kosher dill)
  • 2-1/2 cups of granulated sugar , divided
  • 4 cloves of garlic , minced or thinly sliced and divided
  • 2 teaspoons of pickled jalapeno , chopped, or to taste, can also substitute fresh jalapeno peppers if desired
  • 2 teaspoons of red pepper flakes
  • 2 teaspoons of pickling spice , divided, optional (recipe below)

Drain the pickles and discard juice but reserve the jar. Slice the pickles into 1/4 to 1/2 inch slices and divide into four equal parts.

Begin layering into a larger jar, bowl or container, starting with one-fourth of the pickles - in my case it was roughly a 1-1/2 cup measure of pickles per layer. Top the pickles with 1/2 cup sugar, 1 clove of garlic sliced or chopped, 1/2 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon of chopped jalapeno, and 1/2 teaspoon of the pickling spice, if using, dropping a clove in between the layers. Continue repeating the layers, pouring all of the remaining sugar on top.

Cover jar and store on the counter for about an hour, or until the sugar begins to liquify. Stir or simply shake to mix the pickles well, and pull any undissolved sugar up from the bottom. Cover and leave on the counter for several more hours, or overnight. Stir and refrigerate 1 to 2 additional days. If desired, transfer the pickles with their juices back into the original or other smaller jars and store in the refrigerator. Avoid consuming the whole pickling spices.

Use for snacking, in sandwiches and burgers, in potato and pasta salads, or wherever you would usually eat pickles!

Cook's Note: To keep these on the mild site, simply eliminate the jalapeno and red pepper flakes. Use a large jar (around 46 ounces) of plain, whole, sour dill pickles and slice them 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick for best results. Don't use kosher dills. They don't react well to this process and just turn into a shriveled mess. Be cautious about generics. I used the large jar of Great Value dill pickles and they shriveled on me even though they were not marked kosher. Okay to substitute Splenda for the sugar.

  • 1 tablespoon of whole mustard seed
  • 1/2 tablespoon whole allspice
  • 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon whole cloves, optional
  • 1 small bay leaf, crushed

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.


Don't miss the Chick-fil-A sauce.

"I've searched a long time and now I have my favorite sauce. I had ribs in the Crock Pot and I simmered my sauce for 40 minutes. I then poured some of it on my ribs and let it keep simmering with the ribs. Thirty minutes later the ribs were done and the sauce's ingredients had married nicely."


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You don’t have to be vegan to enjoy these delicious recipes. You might want to add more veggies into your diet, or perhaps you’re looking to reduce your meat intake. Whatever your reasons, at Violife we have put together a wide variety of plant based recipes with your favourite products. They are simple and easy to make and most of all they are for everyone to enjoy - vegans, vegetarians and the whole family!

From crispy salads, juicy veggie burgers and simple veggie sandwiches to Christmas trifles and party popsicles there is a huge collection of sweet and savory vegan recipes to choose from for every occasion. Bon Appétit!

Our recipe section is constantly updated with fresh ideas from our Violife Chefs team so check back soon!


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17. In-N-Out Burger

In-N-Out Burger is known for making everything in-house, from their hand-formed burger patties to, yes, their french fries. The fries are hand-cut and cooked in 100 percent sunflower oil, then sprinkled with salt, which sounds like a winning combo — but unfortunately, they fall flat. If you order a regular fries, they're pale, lacking crispiness and flavor. It comes down to the cooking method. To get the crispiest fries, you should soak your potatoes to remove residual starches, then cook them once at a low temperature to gelatinize the exterior of each fry, then cook them in oil at a high temperature, to get that perfectly crispy exterior. In-N-Out just cuts the potatoes and dumps them in oil for a single fry. You can go off-menu and order well-done fries (or, even better, well-done fries Animal Style), but if you have to work that hard to make a passable order of fries, it seems that the classic recipe just isn't working.


Potatoes O'Brien - Skillet Fried Potatoes

Skillet fried potatoes, also known as home fries and cottage fries in the north, are such an easy side dish, that goes well with breakfast, but also as a dinner side dish. For my classic skillet potatoes I use peeled russets, some onion and that's about it other than the delicious fat used to cook them in - for me, I love using bacon drippings for the extra richness it provides - and the very specific method.

For this version of skillet potato, I prefer to use the smaller, unpeeled red-skinned or new potatoes. The skin is tender, and to me tasty, and they cook up nicely without the steaming process that is necessary for our beloved fried taters and onion. If you prefer to use a russet, rather than a red skinned potato, you certainly can, though I'd click over to that other recipe, because I think that method works best with russets.

I also like these skin-on skillet potatoes cooked with both onion and sweet bell pepper, either red, green or yellow, or any combination of them, making this dish akin to what most folks know as Potatoes O'Brien. You could certainly leave them out if you just want potatoes. Add fresh herbs if you're making it for supper and there are any number of add-ins you can also use with these, from leftover meats, veggies, beans, whatever you like really. Stir in cooked bacon, ground beef, ham, sausage or pork, and when I have some fresh mushrooms, I like to toss in a few of those too.

Recipe: Potatoes O'Brien - Skillet Fried Potatoes

Yield: About 2 to 4 servings

  • 1-1/2 tablespoons of bacon drippings, canola or olive oil
  • 6 medium sized red-skinned potatoes
  • 1/2 cup of Vidalia or yellow onion , coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup of green and/or yellow, orange or red bell pepper , or any combination, coarsely chopped
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Butter, optional
  • Seasoning salt, Cajun/Creole seasoning and/or garlic salt/powder , to taste, optional

Scrub potatoes and pat dry cut into small cubes. Heat bacon drippings or oil in a cast iron skillet over medium heat until hot. Add the potatoes, onion and bell pepper all at once and turn heat up to medium high. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and toss until all the veggies are coated with oil. Let sit uncovered, and without turning, in order to brown underside, then give it an occasional stir to turn and cook all sides of the veggies.

Continue stir frying until the potatoes are tender and you reach the desired level of browning, adjusting the heat as needed. Do not cover. Taste, adjust seasonings as desired, adding any additional seasonings you like, and toss in a tablespoon or so of butter, if desired. Serve immediately.

Cook's Notes: If serving this as a side dish for supper, stir in a bit of fresh chopped herbs just before serving. Some good choices would be crushed or chopped rosemary, chopped dill, thyme, oregano, or flat leaf parsley. Substitute any other potato for the red skinned variety. To make this main dish, stir in cooked bacon, ground beef, ham sausage or pork. Mushrooms are also a great addition.

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.

As an Amazon Associate, Deep South Dish earns from qualifying purchases. See full disclosure for details.


Hey Y’all! Welcome to some good ole, down home southern cooking. Pull up a chair, grab some iced tea, and 'sit a bit' as we say down south. If this is your first time visiting Deep South Dish, you can sign up for FREE updates via EMAIL or RSS feed, or you can catch up with us on Facebook and Twitter too!

© Copyright 2008-2021 – Mary Foreman – Deep South Dish LLC - All Rights Reserved

Material Disclosure: This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Unless otherwise noted, you should assume that post links to the providers of goods and services mentioned, establish an affiliate relationship and/or other material connection and that I may be compensated when you purchase from the provider. You are never under any obligation to purchase anything when using my recipes and you should always perform due diligence before buying goods or services from anyone via the Internet or offline.

DISCLAIMER: This is a recipe site intended for entertainment. By using this site and these recipes you agree that you do so at your own risk, that you are completely responsible for any liability associated with the use of any recipes obtained from this site, and that you fully and completely release Mary Foreman and Deep South Dish LLC and all parties associated with either entity, from any liability whatsoever from your use of this site and these recipes.

ALL CONTENT PROTECTED UNDER THE DIGITAL MILLENNIUM COPYRIGHT ACT. CONTENT THEFT, EITHER PRINT OR ELECTRONIC, IS A FEDERAL OFFENSE. Recipes may be printed ONLY for personal use and may not be transmitted, distributed, reposted, or published elsewhere, in print or by any electronic means. Seek explicit permission before using any content on this site, including partial excerpts, all of which require attribution linking back to specific posts on this site. I have, and will continue to act, on all violations.